Wine in a Can is the new rage- thanks to Underwood by Union Wine

Think your taste buds are too refined for wine in a can? Think no one will buy it?  Wrong. Canned wine is quickly becoming in vogue from South Hampton to Beverly Hills, to Baltimore-DC region. Union Wine Company of Portland, Oregon, who continually make craft wine that is affordable, has risen to the top, with a line of wines that replicate their bottled varietals.

 

Tagged with the line, "Pinkies Down," Underwood canned wine changed the wine game in 2013, when the company first released the cans, in a limited edition, at the 2013 Feast Portland event through a 'Pinkies Down' campaign. In other words, enjoy good wine and leave the pretentiousness behind.

 

In 2014, Wine Enthusiast alluded that Union Wine's, Underwood can-o-wine was making wine "approachable and cool." In 2016, sales of canned wine hit $28 million, up 90% in a year. Nielsen reports that in 2017, canned wine brought in $28 million, basically doubling 2016 sales of $14.5 million and only  $6.4 million in 2015.

Nielsen reports that canned wine today is a $28 million business, up from sales of $14.5 million in 2016 and just $6.4 million the year before.
Nielsen reports that canned wine today is a $28 million business, up from sales of $14.5 million in 2016 and just $6.4 million the year before.
Nielsen reports that canned wine today is a $28 million business, up from sales of $14.5 million in 2016 and just $6.4 million the year before.

Recently, I tried the canned varietals of pinot gris, rose and the pinot noir and was pleasantly pleased. It tasted exactly as it does in the bottle. And, you can see that I tested the rose, on the beach.

 

Wherever I go, I hear positive feedback on the growing popularity of wine in a can. Take it with you to the beach, the ball game or a walk in the park. With each can representing a 1/2 bottle of wine, aka 375 ML, it is a portable, easy purchase for on-the-go.

 

Let me answer your most pressing question. How does the wine stay fresh, true to a bottle taste? As with all canned drinks, there’s a liner in the can that prevents the aluminum from contacting the wine. You never asked how fresh your ginger ale or canned beer were, have you? And, because it is in a can, not glass, the canned wine is protected from light and ages more slowly.

Tasting Notes:

The Bubbles tasting notes: Ripe citrus, tropical fruit, and white flowers

Pinot Noir tasting notes: Cherries, raspberries, and chocolate

Rosé tasting notes: Strawberry, watermelon, and peach

Pinot Gris tasting notes: Peach, grapefruit, and pear

 

So, go out and try the latest and greatest wine trend. I pinky swear you will like it.

 

Patti Neumann is Founder of Sip & Swirl Society & Publisher of CITYPEEK.com, an award-winning blog. Email ceo@citypeek.com

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